Please consider donating to the EveryLibrary Rapid Response Fund!




EveryLibrary is a nonprofit social welfare organization chartered to work exclusively on local library ballot initiatives. How? By training library staff, trustees, and volunteers to plan and run effective Information Only campaigns; by assisting local Vote Yes committees on planning and executing Get Out the Vote work for their library’s measure; and by speaking directly to the public about the value and relevance of libraries and librarians.

EveryLibrary’s Rapid Response Fund is designed to address the single most significant problem in library advocacy today: no one is funding direct outreach to the public or stakeholders when a crisis hits libraries. Too many times, the urgent and necessary calls-to-action issued by local stakeholders are unable to reach activists and constituents because no one is advertising or marketing those calls-to-action. Whether the stakeholders are a group of staff, the local trustees or Friends, an ad hoc community of advocates, or an established trade or professional association, their legitimate voices for the library need support.

From their website: Our Rapid Response Fund is designed to amplify the voices of local library advocates during a crisis by supporting paid ads for outreach and action.  In setting up the Rapid Response Fund we will not attempt to replace or supplant the legitimate local advocates; rather, we will apply best-practices to market them through social media.  The Fund will allow us to drive traffic to their calls-to-action by both new and existing constituents and advocates.  EveryLibrary will not set the agenda or create the calls-to-action.  That responsibility still resides with the local advocates.  They are closer to the issue and are already trusted in their community.  We will work to spend the Rapid Response Funds in a way that creates success through broad-based or targeted advertising that produces measurable results.   

The Rapid Response Fund will put money to work to get the advocacy message in front of the right people and “bring them out” for the library. Please consider donating today! You can also visit for a list of the campaigns and to see how your donation will impact the future of library funding across the country.


Have you seen LA Public Library’s “Shades of LA” archives?

The Los Angeles Library’s “Shades of LA” photo archive contains more than 10,000 images of black, Latino and Asian-American families throughout Southern California dating back to the early 20th century. Here, librarian Kathy Kabayashi explains the very deliberate process of gathering so many images from people’s private archives as part of this grass-roots community history project.

Comments on the Future of the 42nd St. Library

“You want to photograph me eating chicken?”
“Well, if I let you, I need you to help me deliver a message.”
“What’s that?”
“I work at this library. And before that, I was coming here for twenty years. It’s my favorite place in the world. As many people know, the main reading room of this library is supported by seven floors of books, which contain one of the greatest research collections …in the world. Recently, the library administration has decided to rip out this collection, send the books to New Jersey, and use the space for a lending library. As part of the consolidation, they are going to close down the Mid-Manhattan Library Branch as well as the Science, Industry, and Business Library. When everything is finished, one of the greatest research libraries in the world will become a glorified internet cafe. Now read that back to me.” [photograph by Brandon Stanton]
Stop the NYPL’s plan to gut the 42nd St. Library, send 1.5 million books to NJ, and sell the Mid-Manhattan and SIBL libraries.


More info:



“This Is What a Librarian Looks Like”


Philadelphia based photographer/videographer Kyle Cassidy spoke with and photographed librarians at the American Library Association’s (ALA) 2014 Midwinter conference in Philadelphia and the results are in (see the entire photo essay here). Cassidy’s concept was, “If I can put you in front of 50,000 people to tell them one thing about libraries and librarians, what would it be?” In interviews, Cassidy asked librarians to talk about the challenges libraries face and why now, perhaps more than ever, they’re important. Sure, this is only what some librarians look like. That said, I was happy to hear these voices and honestly, I thought everyone looked fabulous (hi Ingrid!)


Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon

[Re-post from the website of the Brooklyn Museum!]
Saturday, February 1, 2014 at 12–3 p.m.
Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Forum, 4th Floor

Bring your laptops and power cords and help us correct Wikipedia’s pervasive gender bias and inaccuracies. Eyebeam Art+Technology Center has initiated an Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon across the U.S. and Canada, and the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art and Project Continua will host its Brooklyn meet-up. Join us as we add authoritative biographical information about the women represented in The Dinner Party, Judy Chicago’s monument to women’s contributions to history, and in Project Continua, an online multimedia resource on women’s intellectual history.

If you’re a beginner Wikipedian who wants to learn more about these largely overlooked feminist figures, reference materials, technical assistance, and a variety of experts will be available.